26 March 2020 Kevin Elgood   | News | Whole School  
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Message from the Principal - Kevin Elgood

This is an update after day 1 of moving to a remote learning mode of delivery.

It appears that some parents did not receive the Email that was sent yesterday, we are endeavouring to rectify this issue and as a safeguard I am also sending all correspondence to your son. If you son has shown you this email/message and you have not received it yourself by tomorrow morning, please contact the school so that we can check our contact information.

We remind you that Homebush Boys High School will remain open and we will provide supervision for students who attend the school. All students, whether at home or at school, will be expected to complete the same online learning content supplied by their teachers.  There will be no normal timetabled lessons for at least the remainder of the term. Students attending school will be allocated a room where they will be supervised and can complete their work. Today 84% of students were absent.

How will Homebush Boys High School facilitate Learning from Home?

  • Timetabled lessons will proceed online and this will be the only mode of lesson delivery for all students, whether working from home or at school.
  • All classes have an online learning platform. This could be Google Classroom, Moodle, or similar.
  • Students are to use this online platform to complete their learning activities and communicate with their teachers.
  • Student questions regarding assessment should be asked directly through the class online learning platform.
  • Video conferencing tools are being explored but may not be used straight away. Communication regarding these technologies will occur after processes have been put in place for their use.

Assessments

  • For Year 7- 10 Examination style (in-class tasks) will NOT be held onsite for the remainder of Term 1. These tasks may proceed in an alternate format and students must ensure they understand the changes. All information about assessment tasks will be communicated by class teacher via the online learning platform.
  • For Students in Years 11 and 12, the school has decided to continue Assessments at this stage pending further advice, NESA has indicated that advice will be provided later this week. Students in Years 11 and 12 are expected to attend school to complete their assessment task and then return home. These tasks will be held in the school hall. I advise students to check their Email and online learning platforms regularly for information regarding assessments and any changes to arrangements or postponements of tasks that may occur.
  • Illness / Misadventure processes will apply in some limited circumstances. Factors solely related to Learning from Home are unlikely to constitute grounds for misadventure. Students are reminded that upon completion, the illness / misadventure application should be emailed to the relevant Head Teacher for processing. The usual rules around illness/misadventure apply.
  • Official school communication will continue as normal via emails.

 

Information about learning from home can be found on the NSW Department of Education website via the link below: 

We have attached some of the advice provided on this site at the end of the letter for anyone unable to access this link.

 

Canteen

The school canteen is closed until the end of Term. Students attending school will need to bring their lunch to school. Ordering Uber Eats or other food delivery is not permitted.

Thank you for your on-going support and understanding. These are unprecedented circumstances, which continue to evolve. The health and safety of our students and staff is of the utmost importance to us.  If you have any concerns or questions please contact the school on 9764-3611.

 
Yours Sincerely,
Mr Kevin Elgood
Principal
 

Learning form Home - Advice to parents and carers 

Parent responsibilities during remote learning:

Provide support for your children by:
  • establishing routines and expectations
  • defining a space for your child to work in\
  • monitoring communications from teachers
  • beginning and ending each day with a check-in
  • taking an active role in helping your children process their learning
  • encouraging physical activity and/or exercise
  • checking in with your child regularly to help them manage stress
  • monitoring how much time your child is spending online
  • keeping your children social, but set rules around their social media interactions.
Student responsibilities during remote learning:
These responsibilities should be adjusted according to the age of your child:
  • establishing and/or following a daily routine for learning
  • identifying a safe, comfortable, quiet space in their home where they can work effectively and successfully
  • regularly monitoring digital platforms and communication (Google classroom, Moodle, Edmodo, email, etc.) to check for announcements and feedback from teachers
  • completing tasks with integrity and academic honesty, doing their best work
  • doing their best to meet timelines, commitments, and due dates
  • communicating proactively with their teachers if they cannot meet deadlines or require additional support
  • collaborating and supporting their classmates in their learning
  • complying with the departments' Student use of digital devices and online services policy'
  • seeking out and communicating with school staff as different needs arise.

Establishing routines and expectations

Your school should provide your child with a schedule or timetable for their learning. This will include regular breaks for activity, eating and drinking. In the activity breaks, it is important that students get up and move around.
From the first day, you will need to establish routines and expectations. You should use the timetable or schedule provided by your school to set regular hours for school work.
Keep normal bedtime routines for younger children and expect the same from your older primary and high school-aged children too.
It is important that you set these expectations as soon as distance learning is implemented, not several days later after it becomes apparent a child is struggling with the absence of routine.

 

Setting up a learning environment
Try to create a quiet and comfortable learning space. Your child may have a regular place for doing homework under normal circumstances, but this space may not be suitable for working in for an extended period of time.
A space/location for extended learning should be a public/family space, not in a bedroom. It should be a place that can be quiet at times and have a strong wireless internet signal, if possible. Above all, it should be a space where you or another adult is present and monitoring your children's learning.
 
Wellbeing
Being confined to home for an extended period of time can cause stress and conflict. Tips for looking after your children during isolation include:
  • Talking to your whole family about what is happening. Understanding the situation will reduce their anxiety.
  • Help your children to think about how they have coped with difficult situations in the past and reassure them that they will cope with this situation too. Remind them that the isolation won't last for long.
  • Exercise regularly. Options could include exercise DVDs, dancing, floor exercises, yoga, walking around the backyard or using home exercise equipment, such as a stationary bicycle, if you have it. Exercise is a proven treatment for stress and depression.
  • Encourage your children to keep in touch with family members and friends via telephone, email or social media (where appropriate).
  • The Health and Wellbeing page has some great ideas for activities to do at home.
 
Being confined to home for an extended period of time can cause stress and conflict. Tips for looking after your children during isolation include:
  • Talking to your whole family about what is happening. Understanding the situation will reduce their anxiety.
  • Help your children to think about how they have coped with difficult situations in the past and reassure them that they will cope with this situation too. Remind them that the isolation won't last for long.
  • Exercise regularly. Options could include exercise DVDs, dancing, floor exercises, yoga, walking around the backyard or using home exercise equipment, such as a stationary bicycle, if you have it. Exercise is a proven treatment for stress and depression.
  • Encourage your children to keep in touch with family members and friends via telephone, email or social media (where appropriate).
  • The Health and Wellbeing page has some great ideas for activities to do at home.
 
Communicating with your child
We encourage you to start and finish each day with a simple check-in. These check-ins need to be a regular part of each day and start straight away. Not all students thrive in a remote learning environment; some struggle with too much independence or lack of structure and the check-ins help keep them on track.
In the morning, ask:
  • what are you learning today?
  • what are your learning targets or goals?
  • how will you be spending your time?
  • what resources do you require?
  • what support do you need?
In the afternoon, ask:
  • what did you learn today?
  • acknowledge one thing that was difficult. Either let it go or come up with a strategy to deal with the same problem if it comes up again
  • consider three things that went well today. Why were they good?
  • are you ok? Do you need to ask your teacher for something? Do you need help with something to make tomorrow more successful?
These specific questions matter because they allow your child to process the instructions they have received from their teachers and help them organise themselves and set priorities. Older students may not want to have these check-ins with parents (this is normal!), but they should anyway.